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Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

According to the CDC, 86 million people in the U.S. have pre-diabetes, and 29.1 million have full-fledged diabetes. Respectively, 90 percent and 27.8 percent don't realize it.

As the statistics suggest, the screening process is highly underutilized, even though the Affordable Healthcare Act ensures free diabetes screenings for adults. A lack of awareness about coverage is one contributor to this problem, which may result in people avoiding screenings. The results of this can be deadly. Undetected pre-diabetes can lead to full-fledged diabetes, and full-fledged diabetes can lead to complications and even fatalities; approximately 71,000 people die annually from the disease.

The number of undiagnosed pre- and full-fledged diabetes cases can be reduced if we work to ensure that screenings become more regular. One solution is to ensure that doctors offer screenings during annual physicals to those at risk (those who are overweight or obese, have high blood pressure, and/or have a family history). Doctors should feel comfortable ordering a diabetes screening test during annual physicals and telling patients that the cost of the test is covered by the Affordable Healthcare Act. The test itself is quick and cost-effective; a simple blood test is all that's required and can easily be conducted during checkups. Most importantly, it can save lives.

Ask Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to make diabetes screenings a routine part of physicals to those who need them.

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Dear Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell:

As you may know, pre- and full-fledged diabetes are frighteningly under-diagnosed health conditions. I sincerely appreciate the Affordable Healthcare Act, which ensures that eligible adults can receive free diabetes screenings. However, as the amount of undiagnosed patients suggests, this resource is severely underutilized. This is partly due to a lack of awareness.

The consequences are monumental. Like any other serious health concern, diabetes ought to be detected as early as possible so that prevention, treatment, and management can begin; otherwise, life-threatening complications may arise. Millions of people in the United States are at risk, simply because they don't know they are diabetic.

To protect at-risk individuals, doctors should feel comfortable ordering a diabetes screening test during annual physicals and telling patients that the cost of the test is covered by the Affordable Healthcare Act. If more screenings take place, more would have a fighting chance against diabetes, simply because they were given an early diagnosis.

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Apr 18, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 15, 2018 (Name not displayed) Early diagnosis is key.
Apr 15, 2018 Joanne Birnberg I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes over 30 years ago and have been under control with diet, exercise and medication ever since. Screening for this condition is vital if lives are to be saved.
Apr 15, 2018 Carmen N Bosque
Apr 15, 2018 Shauna Killen
Apr 15, 2018 Susan Pizza
Apr 15, 2018 Ertie Evangelista
Apr 15, 2018 Linda Mansouri
Apr 15, 2018 Barbara Schiefer Yearly diabetes screening are vital.
Apr 15, 2018 tony Jania A really very good idea....
Apr 15, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 15, 2018 Virginia Lippert It is so important to see a doctor trained to recognize diabetes. Mine did not, not did she know how to treat it. Finally I went to a study group and the doctor there helped.
Apr 15, 2018 Laura Carroll
Apr 15, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 15, 2018 (Name not displayed) As the parent children with Type 1 diabetes and the spouse with Type 2 diabetes, I can attest to the vital need for diabetes screenings
Apr 14, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 8, 2018 Sally Simpson
Apr 8, 2018 Angela Tafoya
Apr 8, 2018 Patricia Cox
Apr 8, 2018 Janet Taylor
Apr 6, 2018 Lisa vasta
Mar 30, 2018 Barbara Tomlinson
Mar 17, 2018 Heidi Buckles
Mar 16, 2018 Leslee Eldard
Mar 15, 2018 Mona Huff
Mar 15, 2018 Mark Lungo
Mar 14, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 14, 2018 Patti Thomas
Mar 14, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 14, 2018 Rebecca Walker
Mar 14, 2018 Katherine King
Mar 14, 2018 Tonya Johnson
Mar 14, 2018 Teresa Perles
Mar 14, 2018 Audrey Martin
Mar 14, 2018 (Name not displayed) some common sense on this subject is all we need.
Mar 14, 2018 Caroline Johnson
Mar 14, 2018 Cheri DAWSON
Mar 14, 2018 HERB ROSENBLUM A very interesting article.
Mar 14, 2018 Carole Leone
Mar 14, 2018 Jerrold Osborn
Mar 14, 2018 Linda McKee Diabetes affects 2 of my now adult children. They were diagnosed as young adults but not before they had frightening symptoms. Had they been diagnosed earlier they would not have to suffered through that. Please consider yearly diabetes screening.
Mar 14, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 14, 2018 Deborah Richards
Mar 14, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 14, 2018 Arleen Barber
Mar 13, 2018 (Name not displayed) Discovered last year after a bout with pneumonia, lost 35-lbs in a month
Mar 13, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 13, 2018 Patricia Adkins
Mar 12, 2018 Salvatore Brunetto
Mar 12, 2018 Marie Maberry Husband (75)just diagnosed. No family history. Slightly obese. Would not meet your criteria. Constantly 110 to 168 blood sugar.

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