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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 4,872
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

Service dogs transform the lives of their charges. From assisting the blind and deaf to helping returning veterans cope with PTSD, the positive impact of their help upon their owners cannot be denied.

People with diabetes can also benefit from being paired with a service dog. With the proper training, dogs can use their superior sense of smell to alert their owners to fluctuating blood sugar. This is especially important among Type 1 diabetics who suffer from a condition known as Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents a person from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

For those with Hypoglycemic Unawareness, an alert dog might mean the difference between life and death.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

There's no denying a diabetic alert dog could save countless lives and improve the quality of life for their owners. So why don't more people have them?

Their cost.

According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average person, this enormous price tag can prevent people with diabetes from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

People with diabetes shouldn't be asked to shoulder this financial burden on their own when they pay insurance premiums! Tell the U.S.'s top five Insurance providers and Obamacare to cover the costs of these dogs for any diabetic whose doctors' recommend them.

Sign Here






To U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and the CEOs of WellPoint Insurance, CIGNA Health Insurance Company, Aetna, Humana, and United Healthcare

I am writing to urge you to add diabetic alert dogs to your insurance policies. I am dismayed that these effective assistants to managing and maintaining awareness of blood glucose levels are effectively uncovered by the insurance industry.

These alert dogs provide life-saving care to people with diabetes, especially those who suffer from Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents diabetics from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

But, as you are no doubt aware, the cost of training a diabetic alert dog can be massive. According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average diabetic, this enormous price tag can prevent them from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

As the nation's most prominent health insurance providers, I'm asking you to lead the charge on making diabetic alert dogs more accessible to your clients. Lives are on the line. And an alert dog could make lived with diabetes easier for so many.

Please, help defray the costs of acquiring a diabetic alert dog. Add these life-saving companions to your policies.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Jun 24, 2017 Miriam Feehily
Jun 13, 2017 Jeffery Webster As a Hypoglycemic Unaware, Type 1 diabetic one of these dogs would be a Godsend for me.
Jun 13, 2017 Linda Butler
Jun 12, 2017 Gil Lahaie Insurance companies are so Money Hungry, and this would Not even place a Dent in the Pockets!
Jun 12, 2017 Audrey Martin
Jun 12, 2017 Teresa Foster
Jun 12, 2017 Michael Lee
Jun 9, 2017 Beth Smith Dog from animal shelters could be used and trained which would not only be cost effective but also help with pet overpopulation.
Jun 9, 2017 Agnes Hetzel
Jun 7, 2017 Nancy Wein
Jun 7, 2017 James Deschene
May 30, 2017 Teresa Kohl
May 28, 2017 Joyce Haskins
May 28, 2017 EMILY FUNKE
May 28, 2017 Joanne Birnberg
May 28, 2017 Joseph Folino Gallo
May 28, 2017 ROBERT ALTOM I AM A TYPE 2 DIABETIC,AND HAVE BEEN FOR 20 YEARS..MY BLOOD GLUCOSE READINGS FLUCUAE BETWEEN HIGH AND EXTREME LOWS,A DIABETIC ALERT DOG WOULD BE A GREAT HELP TO ME IN MY FIGHT AGAINST DIABETES...
May 28, 2017 Lisa Briggs
May 28, 2017 Lorna Greer
May 28, 2017 Sandra Holbrook
May 28, 2017 irv kodimer
May 28, 2017 Donala Richards
May 28, 2017 David Antos
May 28, 2017 Lori Chow
May 28, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 28, 2017 Pamela Unger
May 28, 2017 Nancy Lowe
May 28, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 28, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 28, 2017 Donna Campbell If insurance can cover obese people when they "need" surgery why can't they cover these dogs for people. This is a life threatening disease and should have more coverage to help Type 1 diabetics especially, this disease does not GO AWAY!
May 28, 2017 S.J. Anderson
May 28, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 28, 2017 theresa anderson
May 28, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 28, 2017 David Buckner Having had a lot of family members as well as myself with diabetes. I believe this is a need especially for older people.
May 28, 2017 Susan Dorchin
May 28, 2017 Jen vonSchlieder
May 28, 2017 Sarah Marsh
May 28, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 28, 2017 Vasilis Nisiotis
May 28, 2017 Georgina Rangel
May 28, 2017 oksanna fallon
May 28, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 28, 2017 Sherri Olaguez
May 28, 2017 Emmanuel Xerias
May 20, 2017 Shirley Troia
May 15, 2017 Marly Wexler
May 15, 2017 Lori Cheezem
May 14, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 14, 2017 (Name not displayed)

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