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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 5,385
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

Service dogs transform the lives of their charges. From assisting the blind and deaf to helping returning veterans cope with PTSD, the positive impact of their help upon their owners cannot be denied.

People with diabetes can also benefit from being paired with a service dog. With the proper training, dogs can use their superior sense of smell to alert their owners to fluctuating blood sugar. This is especially important among Type 1 diabetics who suffer from a condition known as Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents a person from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

For those with Hypoglycemic Unawareness, an alert dog might mean the difference between life and death.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

There's no denying a diabetic alert dog could save countless lives and improve the quality of life for their owners. So why don't more people have them?

Their cost.

According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average person, this enormous price tag can prevent people with diabetes from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

People with diabetes shouldn't be asked to shoulder this financial burden on their own when they pay insurance premiums! Tell the U.S.'s top five Insurance providers and Obamacare to cover the costs of these dogs for any diabetic whose doctors' recommend them.

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To U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and the CEOs of WellPoint Insurance, CIGNA Health Insurance Company, Aetna, Humana, and United Healthcare

I am writing to urge you to add diabetic alert dogs to your insurance policies. I am dismayed that these effective assistants to managing and maintaining awareness of blood glucose levels are effectively uncovered by the insurance industry.

These alert dogs provide life-saving care to people with diabetes, especially those who suffer from Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents diabetics from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

But, as you are no doubt aware, the cost of training a diabetic alert dog can be massive. According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average diabetic, this enormous price tag can prevent them from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

As the nation's most prominent health insurance providers, I'm asking you to lead the charge on making diabetic alert dogs more accessible to your clients. Lives are on the line. And an alert dog could make lived with diabetes easier for so many.

Please, help defray the costs of acquiring a diabetic alert dog. Add these life-saving companions to your policies.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Apr 20, 2018 Tika Bordelon
Apr 20, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 20, 2018 Nancy Orhun
Apr 20, 2018 Roberta R Czarnecki
Apr 20, 2018 Айриш Фокс
Apr 20, 2018 Nathalie Clyne
Apr 20, 2018 June Meek
Apr 20, 2018 M Joan Hutton
Apr 20, 2018 Joan Squires
Apr 20, 2018 Sue Knaack
Apr 20, 2018 Leslie Wilbur
Apr 20, 2018 Jennifer grant
Apr 20, 2018 Sue Ellen Lupien
Apr 20, 2018 Jennifer Arnold
Apr 20, 2018 Sheila Gibson
Apr 20, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 20, 2018 Judy Johnson
Apr 20, 2018 Michelle Collar
Apr 20, 2018 Lisa Whitaker
Apr 20, 2018 Marisol Ackerman
Apr 20, 2018 Carmen Rodriguez
Apr 20, 2018 Donna Selquist
Apr 20, 2018 Andrea Giolli
Apr 20, 2018 Beau Ryba
Apr 20, 2018 Laurie Rowan
Apr 20, 2018 Joan Sadlo
Apr 20, 2018 Louise Close
Apr 20, 2018 Teresa Allen
Apr 20, 2018 Sheila Tran
Apr 20, 2018 Stephanie Dejou
Apr 20, 2018 cinzia caporali
Apr 20, 2018 Marlisa James
Apr 20, 2018 Ozzy Costa
Apr 20, 2018 Patty Gamblin
Apr 20, 2018 Ken Wenzer
Apr 20, 2018 Pam Sheeler
Apr 20, 2018 Jennifer Falsetta
Apr 20, 2018 Lynette Rynders
Apr 20, 2018 Hazel Sharrad
Apr 20, 2018 Joan Arnold
Apr 20, 2018 Dawn Longo
Apr 20, 2018 karen stickney
Apr 20, 2018 Neville Bruce
Apr 20, 2018 Tom Rarey
Apr 20, 2018 Darilynn McCoy
Apr 20, 2018 Ana Jacques
Apr 20, 2018 SYLVANA ARGUELLO
Apr 20, 2018 Corey Ahern I would love for my daughter to have an alert dog since she is unaware of her highs and lows and I also think she would feel better about herself knowing she had a constant friend/companion who understood what she was going through!
Apr 20, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 20, 2018 Christine Stever

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