Skip navigation

no spam, unsubscribe anytime.
Skip navigation
Goal: 30,000 Progress: 4,818
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

Service dogs transform the lives of their charges. From assisting the blind and deaf to helping returning veterans cope with PTSD, the positive impact of their help upon their owners cannot be denied.

People with diabetes can also benefit from being paired with a service dog. With the proper training, dogs can use their superior sense of smell to alert their owners to fluctuating blood sugar. This is especially important among Type 1 diabetics who suffer from a condition known as Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents a person from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

For those with Hypoglycemic Unawareness, an alert dog might mean the difference between life and death.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

There's no denying a diabetic alert dog could save countless lives and improve the quality of life for their owners. So why don't more people have them?

Their cost.

According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average person, this enormous price tag can prevent people with diabetes from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

People with diabetes shouldn't be asked to shoulder this financial burden on their own when they pay insurance premiums! Tell the U.S.'s top five Insurance providers and Obamacare to cover the costs of these dogs for any diabetic whose doctors' recommend them.

Sign Here






To U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and the CEOs of WellPoint Insurance, CIGNA Health Insurance Company, Aetna, Humana, and United Healthcare

I am writing to urge you to add diabetic alert dogs to your insurance policies. I am dismayed that these effective assistants to managing and maintaining awareness of blood glucose levels are effectively uncovered by the insurance industry.

These alert dogs provide life-saving care to people with diabetes, especially those who suffer from Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents diabetics from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

But, as you are no doubt aware, the cost of training a diabetic alert dog can be massive. According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average diabetic, this enormous price tag can prevent them from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

As the nation's most prominent health insurance providers, I'm asking you to lead the charge on making diabetic alert dogs more accessible to your clients. Lives are on the line. And an alert dog could make lived with diabetes easier for so many.

Please, help defray the costs of acquiring a diabetic alert dog. Add these life-saving companions to your policies.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Apr 25, 2017 Michelle Baisden
Apr 20, 2017 Sherrie Collins
Apr 20, 2017 Martha Williams
Apr 12, 2017 Amy Kahn
Apr 5, 2017 Emily Ettinger
Apr 2, 2017 Michalla Sutton
Apr 1, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Mar 31, 2017 Tim Young
Mar 29, 2017 Suzanne Ford
Mar 29, 2017 Samantha Cooch
Mar 23, 2017 Grace Clerc
Mar 10, 2017 Heather Zito
Mar 9, 2017 Deborah Lombardi
Mar 7, 2017 natalie hughes
Mar 6, 2017 Jennifer Lavely
Mar 5, 2017 April M I have type 2 and would really love to have an diabetic alert dog.
Mar 4, 2017 Michael Biggs
Feb 28, 2017 Susan Bonta These service dogs literally save people's lives by warning them of a pending seizure, dangerous blood levels, etc. - they need to be covered by insurance - more effective & immediate than waiting to get to/use any medication.
Feb 27, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Feb 26, 2017 Cristina da Cruz
Feb 26, 2017 Aldea Choquette
Feb 25, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Feb 23, 2017 Jessica Porter
Feb 21, 2017 Kristi Weber
Feb 17, 2017 Christa Ulich
Feb 17, 2017 Christina Waskiewicz
Feb 17, 2017 Stephen Contos Fast acknowledgement of a hypoglycemic reaction is key, but when this happens there is often no sensible action noted so a Diabetic Alert Dog can alert and strongly encourage a T1 to acknowledge and treat this before he can become a danger to himself.
Feb 17, 2017 Cynthia Super
Feb 17, 2017 Jeanne Govoni
Feb 17, 2017 Nicole Modricky
Feb 12, 2017 Angelique Burgess
Feb 2, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Feb 2, 2017 Donna Matthews
Jan 31, 2017 Jacqueline Evans
Jan 30, 2017 Bonnie Gallik
Jan 30, 2017 Robert Nandal
Jan 28, 2017 Michelle Howe
Jan 27, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jan 23, 2017 Rogi Rogic
Jan 23, 2017 Nina Domergue
Jan 22, 2017 Patricia Nenadich
Jan 22, 2017 Karin Hart
Jan 20, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jan 19, 2017 sarah woodfield
Jan 17, 2017 Amanda Pratt
Jan 17, 2017 Malchiel Schindler
Jan 15, 2017 Vera Camarinha
Jan 14, 2017 douglas petrey
Jan 14, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jan 10, 2017 (Name not displayed)

back to top

Mystic Charm Sleeveless Tunic
Share this page and help fund research: