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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 5,023
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

Service dogs transform the lives of their charges. From assisting the blind and deaf to helping returning veterans cope with PTSD, the positive impact of their help upon their owners cannot be denied.

People with diabetes can also benefit from being paired with a service dog. With the proper training, dogs can use their superior sense of smell to alert their owners to fluctuating blood sugar. This is especially important among Type 1 diabetics who suffer from a condition known as Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents a person from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

For those with Hypoglycemic Unawareness, an alert dog might mean the difference between life and death.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

There's no denying a diabetic alert dog could save countless lives and improve the quality of life for their owners. So why don't more people have them?

Their cost.

According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average person, this enormous price tag can prevent people with diabetes from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

People with diabetes shouldn't be asked to shoulder this financial burden on their own when they pay insurance premiums! Tell the U.S.'s top five Insurance providers and Obamacare to cover the costs of these dogs for any diabetic whose doctors' recommend them.

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To U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and the CEOs of WellPoint Insurance, CIGNA Health Insurance Company, Aetna, Humana, and United Healthcare

I am writing to urge you to add diabetic alert dogs to your insurance policies. I am dismayed that these effective assistants to managing and maintaining awareness of blood glucose levels are effectively uncovered by the insurance industry.

These alert dogs provide life-saving care to people with diabetes, especially those who suffer from Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents diabetics from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

But, as you are no doubt aware, the cost of training a diabetic alert dog can be massive. According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average diabetic, this enormous price tag can prevent them from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

As the nation's most prominent health insurance providers, I'm asking you to lead the charge on making diabetic alert dogs more accessible to your clients. Lives are on the line. And an alert dog could make lived with diabetes easier for so many.

Please, help defray the costs of acquiring a diabetic alert dog. Add these life-saving companions to your policies.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Jan 15, 2018 Shashawna Foland
Jan 5, 2018 Beverly Folkes
Jan 2, 2018 David Schaechtel
Jan 2, 2018 Julia Russo
Jan 2, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 2, 2018 Pattie Treece
Jan 2, 2018 Valerie Cranmer
Jan 2, 2018 Melody Martin
Jan 2, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 2, 2018 Kerry Boyd
Jan 2, 2018 Elizabeth Baumann Fisher My daughter needs & deserves a diabetic alert dog, but the cost is prohibitive. The medical benefits are astronomical, but so is the cost yet the dog can save her life. Please cover this in insurance!
Jan 2, 2018 Julia Raub
Jan 2, 2018 Roxann Carmean Floyd
Jan 2, 2018 Lynda Kerr
Jan 2, 2018 Eliza Pearl Duncan
Jan 2, 2018 Colette Pape It would be such a freedom to not have to worry about never waking up if I have an episode. This prevents me from keeping a place of my own.
Jan 2, 2018 Tricia Walker Every diabetic should be able to have an alert animal. Dogs are trained and great for the job. But, I have my little Gracie, a cat who's untrained, yet alerts me to dangerous BS lows. I got lucky. Everyone should have this.
Jan 2, 2018 Donna Thomas I am a diabetic and am fortunate that I have a dog, though untrained as an alert dog, that has alerted me to dangerous lows. She has woken me from when I could easily have slipped into a coma. She has saved my life. Please help others to be so lucky.
Jan 2, 2018 Jes Conti
Jan 2, 2018 Joseph Olliges
Jan 2, 2018 Christine stead
Jan 2, 2018 Janice Thompson
Jan 2, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 2, 2018 cathy mitchamore
Jan 2, 2018 Dawn Bowers
Dec 27, 2017 John Dalla
Dec 10, 2017 Lois Hamilton
Dec 4, 2017 (Name not displayed) My son is 17yrs his been having diabetes since 1 1/2 yr his been going thru a lot there’s moment that his blood sugar go low as 25 and Hi over 700 he have a leaning disability and it would be a great idea that he benefit from a diabetic dog servíce
Dec 2, 2017 robin karlsson
Nov 26, 2017 gary tucker
Nov 24, 2017 Rachel OGrady
Nov 16, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Nov 12, 2017 Lois Freeman
Nov 8, 2017 Beah Robinson
Nov 5, 2017 Robert Cooke, Jr.
Nov 5, 2017 Kathy Sparrow
Nov 4, 2017 Ford Smith
Nov 3, 2017 Esther Clayson
Nov 3, 2017 Abby Anis We are currently waiting for our DAD to finish training for our 8 year old who has Type 1. I believe any person who has diabetes should have the option to have an alert dog. They are hero's to their owners.
Nov 2, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Nov 2, 2017 Jennifer Blanchard
Nov 2, 2017 Tara Dana This is a resource that most diabetics can benefit from but can not access due to cost. Please help make this accessible through insurance! It can be lifesaving!
Nov 2, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Oct 28, 2017 Deborah Moore
Oct 25, 2017 Kimberly Wallace
Oct 24, 2017 Karrie Vukelic
Oct 10, 2017 SANDRA VITO
Oct 8, 2017 Maria Larranaga
Oct 1, 2017 Joanne Raby
Sep 30, 2017 Terri Harris-Downing

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