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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 4,351
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

In 2015, America was outraged as the cost of a little-known drug called Daraprim skyrocketed overnight from $13.50 to $750 a pill. In 2016, the ubiquitous allergy medicine Epi-Pen rose from $100 to $600 in an instant.

Why? Profit.

These scandals are just two examples of a pervasive problem with American healthcare, which allows pharmaceutical companies to set prices as they see fit with a patchwork system of insurance providers. There are no restrictions of profit margins. There is little transparency in the pricing process. The result? Americans pay more for prescription drugs than any other nation in the world.

In most European countries, single-payer health systems use their size to negotiate big discounts, but the United States does not have a similar program and Obamacare did nothing to rein in the costs of prescription drugs when it was passed.

Clearly, something needs to change. When the price of lifesaving drugs suddenly goes from affordable to exorbitant, people deserve to understand why. When the VA is allowed to negotiate directly with drug companies, but Medicare is not, Medicare ends up with a deal that's better for the pharmaceutical companies than the people Medicare serves.

Two changes to current American policy would go a long way to ensuring pharmaceutical companies don't exploit the sick:

  1. Require drug-makers to justify the costs of their treatments and disclose major price hikes.
  2. Repeal the noninterference clause of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 which prevents Medicare, the single largest payer for health care in the U.S., from negotiating directly with drug companies.

Tell the Department of Health and Human Services enact the above legislation which would be a good start to controlling out-of-control drug prices in the United States. The American public shouldn't be expected to pad the pocketbooks of wealthy pharmaceutical executives! Lives are on the line.

Sign Here






To the Secretary of Health and Human Services,

I am writing to you to express my concern for the growing cost of prescription drugs in the United States. Pharmaceutical companies are taking advantage of ordinary, sick Americans, and it's up to you to do something about it.

Over the past few years, from Daraprim to EpiPen, we have seen a series of scandals emerge as pharmaceutical companies increase the prices of old drugs in an attempt to increase profits year after year. Since the United States has no single-payer healthcare system, this means the American public is being asked to shoulder the burden of these companies limitless greed at the cost of their health and financial stability.

Clearly, something needs to change. When the price of lifesaving drugs suddenly goes from affordable to exorbitant, people deserve to understand why. When the VA is allowed to negotiate directly with drug companies, but Medicare is not, Medicare ends up with a deal that's better for the pharmaceutical companies than the people Medicare serves.

Two changes to current American policy would go a long way to ensuring pharmaceutical companies don't exploit the sick:

  1. Require drug-makers to justify the costs of their treatments and disclose major price hikes.
  2. Repeal the noninterference clause of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 which prevents Medicare, the single largest payer for health care in the U.S., from negotiating directly with drug companies.

Please, enact the above policies which would be a good start to controlling out-of-control drug prices in the United States. The American public shouldn't be expected to pad the pocketbooks of wealthy pharmaceutical executives.

Petition Signatures


May 9, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 23, 2018 Barbara Leary
Apr 22, 2018 Gilbert Ramirez
Apr 18, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 14, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Apr 11, 2018 Lisa vasta
Mar 30, 2018 Barbara Tomlinson
Mar 30, 2018 Martha Williams
Mar 27, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Mar 26, 2018 Margery Gurrola I am retired, on a fixed income -- 2 injectable insulins and test strips are expensive
Mar 24, 2018 Kathi Palmer
Mar 22, 2018 Denice Liska
Mar 22, 2018 Richard Bosboom
Mar 17, 2018 DUANE BARTAWAY It's about time legislation places drug manufactures on notice that insulin is necessary for life and should be justified in market place and become affordable. People shouldn't have to choose to buy their insulin or food. A ceiling is necessary.
Mar 6, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Feb 26, 2018 Lourdes Velandia Calderon
Feb 25, 2018 Jeanine Smegal
Feb 25, 2018 Mark Lungo
Feb 25, 2018 Gaya Covington
Feb 25, 2018 (Name not displayed) Patients need help. We don't need to keep lining the pockets of the already compensated.
Feb 25, 2018 J Miller
Feb 25, 2018 Patty langford THIS IS ONE REASON PEOPLE FROM NORWAY DON'T WANT TO LIVE HERE!!! WE 69TH IN THE WAY COUNTRIES PROVIDE FOR THEIR PEOPLE!!!!
Feb 25, 2018 Maryanne Budetti
Feb 25, 2018 John Cooper
Feb 25, 2018 Eliza Pearl Duncan
Feb 25, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Feb 25, 2018 Pamela Meador
Feb 24, 2018 Kenneth Davies
Feb 23, 2018 Jodi Ford
Feb 16, 2018 Carl O Connor
Feb 15, 2018 Rebecca Glass
Feb 13, 2018 Sharon Westberg I am a diabetic type 1. Insulin is needed to live. In 2 days, without using insulin, I would be dead. This is a life saving medication. Insulin has been around for so many years and it’s crazy how expensive it is.
Feb 5, 2018 Elizabeth Wolff
Feb 4, 2018 Sandra Richards
Jan 28, 2018 Ms. Carla Compton, Activist/Advocate
Jan 23, 2018 Kevin Dahl
Jan 21, 2018 Michael Blevins
Jan 15, 2018 Michael Wehmeyer
Jan 15, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 5, 2018 T.J. Pitts
Jan 5, 2018 Robin Bressler
Dec 23, 2017 Geniece Medsker
Dec 17, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Dec 17, 2017 william murtha
Dec 17, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Dec 17, 2017 (Name not displayed) Costs of drugs that are over fifty years old are not allowed to be considered generic, thus enabling their prices to be repeatedly raised.
Dec 17, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Dec 17, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Dec 17, 2017 Leslie Peppard
Dec 16, 2017 Larry Kubicek

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