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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 90
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

When it comes to feeding our families, there should be no second guessing whether commercially available food is safe or nutritious. For too long, the lax requirements dealing with food expiration dates have prompted confusing labeling at best, resulting in hundreds of thousands of tons in wasted food and hungry households.

Apart from baby formula, there is no federally mandated system in the United States to classify dates by which products must be sold by, are freshest by, and expire, and the differences between. Fewer than 25 states currently require dating labels at all, and where it is required, the date may refer to some characteristic other than food quality.

The USDA maintains that "use-by" and "sell-by" dates may not determine when a product needs to be thrown away, and that products may still be "safe, wholesome, and of good quality" after that period if handled properly. But such obscure details are lost on many, leading to at least 40 percent of all food in the US going to waste, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The inefficiencies of this system are putting the nutritional needs of a significant and growing number of Americans at risk. In a 2015 report by Feeding America, it was found that 42.2 million Americans lived in food insecure households, including 29.1 million adults and 13.1 million children.

While staggering, these numbers cannot be reduced without an adequate and easily employed solution to determining quality and freshness. Such an option has been proposed by the private and nonprofit collaborative ReFED, formed in 2015 to draw up a "Roadmap to Reduce U.S. Food Waste."

ReFED's plan, standardizing date labeling throughout the country, could feasibly prevent 400,000 tons of food going to waste in its first year alone.

Other innovations in label design could provide solutions to the problem as well. In a Wired article from July 2016, a strip that changes color to indicate freshness over time was proposed, as were design alterations to ingredient details that simplify and emphasize important nutritional facts.

We need legislation at the federal level which creates a nationally recognized system for expiration dates, requiring labels indicate a food's peak freshness date as well as the date after which the food is unsafe to eat. The technology to do so is not only available, but easily implemented.

Sign below and tell the FDA's Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements that national standards for expiration dates need to be put in place now!

Sign Here






Dear Food and Drug Administration, Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements,

For far too long, the lax requirements dealing with food expiration dates have prompted confusing labeling at best, resulting in hundreds of thousands of tons in wasted food and hungry households.

When it comes to feeding our families, there should be no second guessing whether commercially available food is safe or nutritious.

Apart from baby formula, there is no federally mandated system in the United States to classify dates by which products must be sold by, are freshest by, and expire, and the differences between. Fewer than 25 states currently require dating labels at all, and where it is required, the date may refer to some characteristic other than food quality.

The USDA maintains that "use-by" and "sell-by" dates may not determine when a product needs to be thrown away, and that products may still be "safe, wholesome, and of good quality" after that period if handled properly. But such obscure details are lost on many, leading to at least 40 percent of all food in the US going to waste, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The inefficiencies of this system are putting the nutritional needs of a significant and growing number of Americans at risk. In a 2015 report by Feeding America, 42.2 million Americans lived in food insecure households, including 29.1 million adults and 13.1 million children.

While staggering, these numbers cannot be reduced without an adequate and easily employed solution to determining quality and freshness. Such an option has been proposed by the private and nonprofit collaborative ReFED, formed in 2015 to draw up a "Roadmap to Reduce U.S. Food Waste."

ReFED's plan, standardizing date labeling throughout the country, could feasibly prevent 400,000 tons of food waste even year.

Other innovations in label design could provide solutions to the problem as well. In a Wired article from July 2016, a strip that changes color to indicate freshness over time was proposed, as were design alterations to ingredient details that simplify and emphasize important nutritional facts.

We as Americans deserve a better system, and the technology to do so is not only available, but easily implemented.

I demand legislation at the federal level to create nationally recognized guidelines for expiration dates, requiring labels indicate a food's peak freshness date as well as the date after which the food is unsafe to eat.

 

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Mar 15, 2017 Richard Bosboom
Mar 15, 2017 Richard Bosboom
Mar 3, 2017 N Sayer
Mar 2, 2017 Jason Borda
Mar 1, 2017 Tobi Zausner
Mar 1, 2017 (Name not displayed) This is very important, most people to do understand even vaguely about the dates
Mar 1, 2017 Jonathan Ringdahl
Mar 1, 2017 Deborah Brown
Mar 1, 2017 DOUG SNYDER
Mar 1, 2017 Elise Buffie
Mar 1, 2017 Sharon Evans-Ford
Mar 1, 2017 Larry Branson Absolutely
Mar 1, 2017 Patricia Chandler People deserve protection.
Mar 1, 2017 M Warner
Mar 1, 2017 Evelyn Leslie
Mar 1, 2017 Christina Gardner
Mar 1, 2017 Paul Ferrari
Mar 1, 2017 Susan Wilson
Mar 1, 2017 Selena Millman
Mar 1, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Mar 1, 2017 Linda Serio
Mar 1, 2017 C. Marshall
Mar 1, 2017 S.J. Anderson
Mar 1, 2017 Brandy Schumacher
Mar 1, 2017 Ivy Hoang
Mar 1, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Mar 1, 2017 William Sullivan We desperately need a system that tells consumers when a product can be dangerous to consume.
Mar 1, 2017 Julia Wade
Mar 1, 2017 Denis Cole
Mar 1, 2017 Marion Friedl
Mar 1, 2017 Sue Ann Eliserio
Mar 1, 2017 Vasilis Nisiotis
Mar 1, 2017 Karen Wyatt
Mar 1, 2017 Christopher Walker
Mar 1, 2017 freddie williams
Mar 1, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Mar 1, 2017 Jean Naples As a physician, I urge the FDA to realize that national standards for expiration dates need to be put in place now! national standards for expiration dates need to be put in place now!
Mar 1, 2017 Duncan Duchov
Mar 1, 2017 Maria dels Àngels Beltran
Mar 1, 2017 Emmanuel Xerias
Feb 27, 2017 AMY WILLIAMS
Feb 25, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jan 23, 2017 Nina Domergue
Jan 22, 2017 Patricia Nenadich
Jan 20, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jan 4, 2017 Luis Chelotti
Jan 4, 2017 Anthony Charles
Jan 2, 2017 Gilberto Simao
Dec 31, 2016 Donna Sawyer
Dec 30, 2016 Gen Agustsson fruits and vegetables do not cause disease! only animal proteins do cause disease related to parasites. fruits and veggies have labels for expiration date but not all?

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