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Corrine's Law will educate women on fertility preservation options and ensure that fertility treatment is accessible to all!


Corinne Dinges, M.D. was an Oklahoma native in her OB/GYN residency when she was diagnosed with Ewing Sarcoma, a rare and aggressive form of bone cancer1. Corinne knew the risk chemotherapy and radiation posed to her fertility. She preserved her eggs prior to beginning treatment and was passionate about informing other young, recently-diagnosed women of available fertility preservation procedures.

Dinges battled Ewing's Sarcoma and Leukemia for three years. Dinges died on August 17, 2021 but her mission to help Oklahoma women lives on through her friends and family.

Carly Kirkland is one of those women, now in remission for osteosarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer. She thanks Corinne for helping her make the decision to preserve her eggs2.

Kirkland had only ten days to preserve her eggs before her treatment started, which led to issues with her insurance company.

"When paired with the race against the clock to start chemo and then the large sum of money that is required for a lot of people it's just too much and they just think we will worry about it later well later is often too late," Kirkland said.

Because of Corinne, Kirkland knew her options for having a family and now she is fighting for other women to have that same chance.

Corrine's Law, Senate Bill 1599, has two main goals, to educate women on their fertility preservation options and ensure that fertility treatment is accessible to everyone battling cancer3.

"I think that she would be thrilled to know that no one else even has to think about this decision if this legislation were to pass. I just think there is no better way to honor her and her legacy and her heart for others." Kirkland said4.

Many are not aware of the irreparable damage cancer treatment may have on one's fertility when diagnosed with cancer during childbearing years. Recommended treatment protocols such as surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and/or long-term drug therapy will often result in infertility5.

These procedures are not covered by most insurance companies, and the prohibitive out of pocket cost to preserve fertility ahead of treatment averages $15,000 in many US states; it also poses a risk to the health and longevity of patients during and after treatment6. For example, many women choose a less toxic dose of chemotherapy in order to mitigate potential effects on future fertility - even if it means their cancer may come back6.

Thousands will be diagnosed with cancer in 2022 and those between 18-40 may be unable to have children unless they preserve their fertility.

Create a brighter future for Oklahomans battling cancer. Sign the petition and support Corinne's Law!

More on this issue:

The Oklahoman (12 August 2021), "Corinne Dinges, M.D.."* Jordan Dafnis, News 9 (29 September 2021), "Organizers Seek Better Fertility Preservation Options For Women Battling Cancer."

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The Petition:

Dear Oklahoma State Senator,

I am writing to urge you to support Corinne's Law (SB1599), prospective legislation that would provide insurance coverage for oncofertility preservation procedures in Oklahoma.

Corinne Dinges, M.D. was an Oklahoma native in her OB/GYN residency when she was diagnosed with Ewing Sarcoma, a rare and aggressive form of bone cancer. Because of her medical background, Corinne knew the risk chemotherapy and radiation posed to her fertility. She preserved her eggs prior to beginning treatment and was passionate about informing other young, recently-diagnosed women of available fertility preservation procedures. Corinne tragically passed in August of 2021 from Myledoplastic Syndrome, a type of leukemia resulting from her Ewing's treatment.

A cancer diagnosis pervades all aspects of a young person's life, including their future ability to have children. While lifesaving chemotherapy and radiation treatments are necessary for nearly all types of cancer diagnoses, they often severely damage the patient's reproductive system.

The good news is that iatrogenic infertility is preventable by procedures such as egg freezing and sperm preservation. These procedures, however, cost upwards of $15,000 and are hardly ever covered by insurance companies. This financial burden, when paired with the race against time to begin treatment, often deter patients from preserving their fertility. Several states have passed legislation mandating coverage of oncofertility procedures. Oklahoma, however, is not one of them.

Oklahoma law currently requires insurance companies to cover nearly every other side effect of cancer treatment, including nausea, pain, and hair loss. When faced with the choice between one's life and fertility, the choice is obvious, but no one should ever have to make that choice in the first place.

Corinne's Law would ensure that oncofertility preservation is accessible to every recently diagnosed cancer patient in the state of Oklahoma.

I am asking you to support SB1599, helping cancer patients, help[ing women, and helping all Oklahomans.

Sincerely,

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Signatures: